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pk107码百分百准

时间: 2019年11月20日 23:21 阅读:586

pk107码百分百准

Nothing else can quite substitute for a few well-chosen, well-timed, sincere words of praise. They'reabsolutely freeand worth a fortune. Give Me an A! Samuel Moore WaltonBentonville,Arkansas pk107码百分百准 Give Me an A! That's queer, thought Oliver, but he did not dwell too much on the thought. He was too well satisfied with having been the favored one, for this time at least. As I do look back though, I realize that ours is a story about the kinds of traditional principles that madeAmericagreat in the first place. It is a story about entrepreneurship, and risk, and hard work, andknowing where you want to go and being willing to do what it takes to get there. It's a story aboutbelieving in your idea even when maybe some other folks don't, and about sticking to your guns. But Ithink more than anything it proves there's absolutely no limit to what plain, ordinary working people canaccomplish if they're given the opportunity and the encouragement and the incentive to do their best. � � � 鈥榃hose quarter is that?鈥?the aide-de-camp asked of a passing orderly, pointing back, after they had ridden a little way on. "Bentonville really was just a sad-looking country town, even though it had a railroad track to it. It wasmostly known for apples, but at the time chickens were beginning to come on. I remember I couldn'tbelieve this was where we were going to live. It only had 3,000 people, compared to Newport, whichwas a thriving cotton and railroad town of 7,000 people. The store was a small old country town storewith cans of lace, boxes of hats, sewing patterns, everything you can imagine just stored aroundeverywhere. But I knew right after we got here that it was going to work out."Now I had a store to run again, and even though it didn't do but $32,000 the year before I boughtit-compared to $250,000 at Newportit didn't matter that much because I had big plans. We tore thewall out between the barbershop and the old store, put in brand-new fluorescent fixtures instead of thefew low-watt bulbs they had hanging from the ceiling, and basically built a new store in there. It was ahuge store for Bentonville at the time50 feet by 80 feet, or 4,000 square feet. Charlie Baum of BenFranklin came to my rescue again. This time he helped me break down all those fixtures he had helpedme put up in my old Eagle Store. We loaded them onto a big truck, which I drove over to Bentonvillefrom Newport. We had to get on an old dirt road to bypass a weigh station over at Rogers because Iknew our load was illegal several different ways. Bouncing on that old road tore up half the fixtures. I read in some trade publication not long ago that of the top 100 discounters who were in business in1976, 76 of them have disappeared. Many of these started with more capital and visibility than we did, inlarger cities with much greater opportunities. They were bright stars for a moment, and then they faded. Istarted thinking about what really brought them down, and why we kept going. It all boils down to nottaking care of their customers, not minding their stores, not having folks in their stores with goodattitudes, and that was because they never really even tried to take care of their own people. If you wantthe people in the stores to take care of the customers, you have to make sure you're taking care of thepeople in the stores. That's the most important single ingredient of Wal-Mart's success. By enquiry Mrs. Kenyon ascertained that the little girl had run after some flowers, while the careless nurse, not observing her absence, had gone on, and so lost her. Give Me an A! They tried to ignore it.